Editor’s Pick: Multiphysics simulation to prepare for part sintering

With the Desktop Metal Live Sinter upgrade, the goal is to create 3D printed metal parts for high-volume production.

With the Desktop Metal Live Sinter upgrade, the goal is to create 3D printed metal parts for high-volume production.

Multiphysics simulation software Live Sinter now includes the ability to make scan-based adjustments to fine-tune simulation. Image courtesy of Desktop Metal. 


Desktop Metal has released an upgrade to its multiphysics simulation software that automates the generation of sinter-ready, printable parts and other required geometry such as supports, setters and inserts. The goal is to create 3D printed metal parts for high-volume production at high precision. 

This upgrade improved upon the original version that shipped in 2020. The company considers Live Sinter to be a key enabler of its binder jet platform that is designed to accelerate the move to volume production using metal additive manufacturing. 

Sintered Part, typical result; and sintered part, Live Sinter result. Image courtesy of Desktop Metal.

Live Sinter predicts and corrects for shrinkage and distortion in part designs in as little as 20 minutes, according to Desktop Metal. The result is sinter-ready, printable geometries. 

New in this upgrade is the ability to make scan-based adjustments. In essence users can fine-tune their simulation results based on one or more scans to “further dial in part accuracies,” according to the company. 

The company says this combination of simulation and scan-based adjustments makes it a “unique tool for optimizing metal binder jetting parts production.” 

“One of my biggest worries investing in this technology was the furnace and the frustration of failing that far into the process during sintering,” says Neil Glazebrook, vice president of 3D Solutions at ABCorp in Boston. “Using Live Sinter, I’m blown away at our success with the sintering furnace. I don’t have to use sintering supports anymore, so I don’t have to charge for supports. I use Live Sinter for everything, and it makes it more competitive.”

More information on Live Sinter is available here.

Sources: Press materials received from the company and additional information gleaned from the company’s website.

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